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Research

Recent research on aspects of global education in Initial Teacher Education and Training.

Education for global citizenship: the knowledge, understanding and motivation of trainee teachers
Holden, C., Clough, N., Hicks, D. and Martin, F.

Providing a global dimension to Citizenship Education: a collaborative approach to student learning within Primary Initial Teacher Education
Martin, F.
University College Worcester

Education for citizenship: teaching about democracy and the law in primary initial teacher education
Holden, C.
Exeter University

Dealing with controversial issues with primary teacher trainees as part of citizenship education
Claire, H.
London Metropolitan University

Primary Design & Technology and Citizenship
Cathy Growney
University of Central England


Education for global citizenship: the knowledge, understanding and motivation of trainee teachers.
Holden, C., Clough, N., Hicks, D. and Martin, F.

Abstract

Report Presentation

 

 

 

 


The World Studies Trust wanted to know how much understanding trainee teachers have of global issues and how much commitment they have to incorporating a global dimension into their teaching. Four Trustees, Cathie Holden (Exeter University), David Hicks (Bath Spa University), Fran Martin (University College Worcester), and Nick Clough (University of West of England) carried out a small scale study using as their starting point the 1998 Mori Poll where over 1000 school children were questioned about their knowledge of global issues.

The study involved students from 4 universities in the South West of England and set out to investigate:

  • How knowledgeable are trainees of global issues?
  • Where does their knowledge and understanding come from?
  • How prepared (and motivated) are they to include global perspectives in their teaching?

The report will be published shortly and it is hoped that further funding will be available to develop this research. A pre-publication research report is available here.

 

Providing a global dimension to Citizenship Education: a collaborative approach to student learning within Primary Initial Teacher Education
Martin, F.
University College Worcester

Abstract
This research report describes, analyses and evaluates a year-long project undertaken at University College Worcester (UCW). The context for the project was student teachers' learning about citizenship and PSHE and their application of this to their practice during serial and block school experience. For the purposes of this report, I will focus on the global citizenship education strand of the project.

 

Education for citizenship: teaching about democracy and the law in primary initial teacher education
Holden, C.
Exeter University

Abstract

· When can we fit it in?
· What about the parents?
· What should I include?
· Is it too difficult for primary age children?
· I'm not sure little kids are interested.
· I feel it's important but I don't know enough myself....

The above comments/questions were made by undergraduate primary trainee teachers who were following a ten week course on Education for Citizenship. They were expressing their concerns before beginning the two sessions which specifically focussed on teaching about democracy and the law. Similar comments were made by both PGCE trainees taking a shorter course and experienced teachers following a 30 hour continuing professional development (CPD) programme. Teaching about democracy and the law seems to be the most problematic of the areas of the new framework for citizenship at key stages one and two: it is a new area for many primary teachers, there is little research on what works and there are few resources. I have chosen to focus on this area for this report in the hope that discussing the challenges and successes I have had with my own trainees (and teachers on CPD) will be useful to others.

 

Dealing with controversial issues with primary teacher trainees as part of citizenship education
Claire, H.
London Metropolitan University

Abstract
In this article I argue that dealing with controversial issues is an essential part of education for democracy and touches on all the main strands of citizenship education. We need to analyse WHY people are divided. I outline some of the concepts to do with values, ethics and theoretical approaches to resolving conflict which relate to social and moral education. I then discuss some of the blocks to open minded thinking and logical argument that get in the way of rational approaches to dealing with controversy. The section on the possible content of work on controversy connects both with pupils' and students' own lives, with the curriculum and the community.

 

Primary Design & Technology and Citizenship
Growney, C.
University of Central England

Abstract
"Many still regard PSHE and the Humanities as the only position from which to deliver Citizenship Education. Indeed it is difficult to find teaching resources, among the collections of Citizenship Education resources, which are not linked solely to these curriculum areas. This has resulted in a narrow and fragmented view of Citizenship Education. I believe Design and Technology provides an obvious site for Citizenship Education. I use specific examples from Initial Teacher Education, Continuing Professional Development and from primary schools to make the case that, as many technology educationalists have shown, aspects of Citizenship can be embedded through “values” in Design and Technology education."

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